Posts Tagged ‘director

22
Feb
08

Chek out Leonid Rozhetskins Cast Members on “Boogie Woogie” and get as excited as I am

“Boogie Woogie”, co-produced by Leonid Rozhetskin, is supposed to be relaesed this Year. Currently the movies status is in “post production” and there arent a lot of details yet. But just have a look at the casting and find all these famous names such as Christipher Lee or Heather Graham and I think you will waite as desperate as me for the final release.

Directed by

Duncan Ward  

Writing credits

(in alphabetical order)

Danny Moynihan novel
Danny Moynihan screenplay

Cast (in alphabetical order)

Heather Graham Beth Freemantle
Amanda Seyfried Paige Prideaux
Gillian Anderson Jean Maclestone
Christopher Lee Alfred Rhinegold
Stellan Skarsgård Bob Maccelstone
Alan Cumming Dewey
Charlotte Rampling Emille
Danny Huston Art Spindle
Jaime Winstone Elaine
Joanna Lumley Alfreda Rhinegold
Alfie Allen Photographer
Gemma Atkinson Charlotte Bailey
Simon McBurney Robert Freign
Jack Huston Joe
Meredith Ostrom Joany
Stephen Greif Bobs Lawyer
Rosie Fellner Rachel Leighton
Michael Culkin Beth’s Father
Jenny Runacre Mrs. Havermeyer
Sidney Cole Cabbie
Jan Uddin Art’s Partner
Gaetano Jouen Himself

Produced by

Katrine Boorman …. executive producer
Steve Daly …. associate producer
Matthew Hobbs …. executive producer
Danny Moynihan …. producer
Kami Naghdi …. producer
Leonid Rozhetskin …. executive producer
Christopher Simon …. producer
Julia Stannard …. co-producer
Valentine Stockdale …. executive producer
Cat Villiers …. producer

Cinematography by

John Mathieson  

Film Editing by

Kant Pan  

Casting by

Gary Davy  

Production Design by

Caroline Greville-Morris  

Art Direction by

Nick Dent  

Production Management

Emma Pike …. production manager
Alex Sutherland …. production supervisor

Second Unit Director or Assistant Director

Alexander Fielding …. floor assistant director
Caroline Hatchman …. floor assistant director
Mark Hopkins …. second assistant director
Alex Oakley …. first assistant director
Emily Perowne …. third assistant director

Art Department

Joe Borowski …. stand-by props

Sound Department

Ken Lee …. sound mixer

Camera and Electrical Department

Sam Garwood …. camera operator
Paul Hatchman …. key grip
Mark Tillie …. still photographer

Other crew

Lorraine Edwards …. production secretary
Daniel Fellows …. location manager
Lewis Partovi …. production coordinator
Alex Sutherland …. production supervisor
Brigitte Ward-Holmes …. assistant accountant

Related;

 

Leonid Rozhetskin Co-Founder of the L+E Productions Production Company
Leonid Rozhetskin | L+E Productions Film Production 
Category:Film producers – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
L+E Productions : Leonid Rozhetskin
Leonid RozhetskinWikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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17
Feb
08

Leonid Rozhetskin is doing the “Electris Slide” via NY Times

Leonid Rozhetskin is doing the Electric Slide

and I am not talking about the dance, but the freshly announced Movie.
Check it out
Director: Tristan Patterson
Cast: Romain Duris
Rating: NR

Review Summary

Biopic on charmer, Eddie Dodson, who ran a Melrose art deco store owner as a cover for his exploits as a bankrobber. In 1984, Dodson robbed 64 banks in less than a year. Arrested, Dodson served a 12-year sentence and once released, went on to work as caretaker for Jack Nicholson’s Malibu home. Eventually, though, Dodson was again arrested in 1999 for bank robbery and died at the age of 54 due to a failed liver. ~ Baseline StudioSystems

Movie Details

Title: The Electric Slide
Status: Announced
Country: United States
Genre: Drama, Crime, Biopic

Acting Credits & Production Credits

 
DirectorTristan Patterson
Source MaterialTimothy Ford
ScreenplayTristan Patterson
Executive ProducerJohn Wells
Executive Producer – Timothy Ford
Production Executive – Christine Vachon
Producer – Eric D. Eisner
Producer – Leonid Rozhetskin

 

Related;

13
Feb
08

Leonid Rozhetskin; Hamlet2 via Reuters

“Hamlet 2” sends up suburbia in rowdy fashion

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Hamlet 2

By Duane Byrge

PARK CITY, Utah (Hollywood Reporter) – If art-house theatres still do weekend midnight showings where everyone dresses up as characters from the film, “Hamlet 2” would be a fitting selection. An erratic, freewheeling satire of Middle American mores, it should thrive as a festival curio, appealing to anti-establishment sensibilities.

The film’s marketers will face a challenge inducing the word-snobs of the smart set to slum with slapstick entertainment. Still, there’s enough rowdy and off-the-wall humour in “Hamlet 2” to perform princely at the box-office, particularly in college-city venues.

A slam-bang patchwork of more inspired comedies, such as “Ace Ventura: Pet Detective” and “Borat,” “Hamlet 2” centres on Dana Marschz (Steve Coogan), who attempts to teach drama in a Tucson, Arizona, high school. With delusions that he is soaring to great heights like Icarus, this doofus presents high school plays based on his favourite movies, including “Dead Poets Society” and “Mr. Holland’s Opus,” which appeal to his inflated ego but leave his charges flat. His productions are major fiascos, rightfully skewered by a ninth-grade drama critic.

In one of the movie’s many funny lines, Marschz admits that his life is like a parody of tragedy: He’s infertile, his wife is having an affair with their roommate, he has father issues, and he’s a recovering alcoholic. Not to mention, he’s talent-less.

Dramatically, “Hamlet 2” is a twist on the formula of let’s-put-on-a-show, with the twist being that no one wants the show, least of all the administration, which has chopped the school’s art funds. Even arts-funding advocates would notice that Marschz’s grandiose piffles are a major waste. As such, the film unwittingly makes a case for slashing funds for the arts. Lo, and unfortunately we behold, Marschz does smite the school board Philistines (not exactly a difficult target) with a last-ditch rally and a from-the-rafters opus.

Unlike Ace Ventura, Inspector Clouseau or other lovable loonies, Marschz is merely a knucklehead errant. He’s a creep, but he’s nicely endeared to us by Coogan’s funny, fey performance. Among the players, Elisabeth Shue delivers a winning rendition of herself; her appearance as a Tucson nurse who has rejected her show business career is one of the film’s best absurdities. Similarly, Amy Poehler is hilarious as a WASP-y, anti-Semitic ACLU lawyer.

Screenwriters Andrew Fleming and Pam Brady have slapped together a string of gags in a hit-and-miss dither. Some of it is quite brainy. There’s an appealing anarchic tone and anti-authority bent as well. There also are zany surrealistic moments and a devilish eye for incongruity, especially a rousing rendition of Elton John’s “Someone Saved My Life Tonight” as belted out by the Tucson Gay Chorus for the boondocks high school audience.

Director Fleming blasts the production along with keen comic pacing, which performs double duty in masking some of the more dim-witted moments.

Technically, “Hamlet 2” is distinguished by production designer Tony Fanning’s sendup of Southwestern suburbia.

Cast:

Dana Marschz: Steve Coogan

Brie Marschz: Catherine Keener

Herself: Elisabeth Shue

Cricket Feldstein: Amy Poehler

Gary: David Arquette

Principal Rocker: Marshall Bell

Octavio: Joseph Julian Soria

Rand Posin: Skylar Astin

Director: Andrew Fleming; Screenwriters: Andrew Fleming, Pam Brady; Producers: Eric Eisner, Leonid Rozhetskin, Aaron Ryder; Executive producers: Albert Berger, Ron Yerxa, Michael Flynn; Director of photography: Alexander Gruszynski; Editor: Jeff Freeman; Production designer: Tony Fanning; Music: Ralph Sall.

Reuters/Hollywood Reporter

Leonid Rozhetskin External links

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29
Jan
08

Interview with the Cast of Leonid Rozhetskins co-produced Hamlet2

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Via Entertaiment Weekly

 

Sundance Q&A: The Cast of ”Hamlet 2

Steve Coogan, Elisabeth Shue, and David Arquette talk about their high-school-set comedy, likely to remain the fest’s biggest acquisition

 

 

 

STEVE COOGAN (left, with Catherine Keener) on Hamlet 2: ”Ours is a film that makes you laugh. It’s not a film that makes you think. But if you want to think, you can”

By the eighth day of this year’s Sundance Film Festival, director Andrew Fleming’s comedy Hamlet 2 remained the biggest acquisition, selling to Focus Features for $10 million. The comedy revolves around a high-school drama teacher (Steve Coogan) who stages a sequel to Shakespeare’s play in order to save his department from budget cuts.

On the afternoon before the film’s premiere, EW.com chatted with Coogan and his fellow cast members David Arquette and Elisabeth Shue at EW’s photo studio. (Sadly, Hamlet 2 costar Catherine Keener did not make the trip to Sundance this year.)

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Are you excited for tonight’s premiere?
DAVID ARQUETTE: I haven’t seen it yet, so I’m nervous. It seems like people have been enjoying it, though.

And you play…?
ARQUETTE: I play Gary. I’m the guy who lives at [Steve Coogan and Catherine Keener’s] house. They only let me live there because I have a car. They don’t have a car. I drive them everywhere. I think I’m supposed to be a trainer in it. I’m very fitness-oriented, but I don’t have any actual clients. I have a small part. I only have about 10 lines in it. And I think one of my scenes got cut, too. I was sad. I play a dumb guy in it. Which I tend to do well.

Well, you’re playing against type.
ARQUETTE: I hope so. [Laughs] Or maybe I’m just dumb.

[Arquette gets called to get his picture taken. Elisabeth Shue steps up.]

Hello. Are you enjoying Sundance?
ELISABETH SHUE: It’s really fun to be back. The most moving time I’ve had at Sundance was two years ago because Davis [Guggenheim, Shue’s husband] premiered An Inconvenient Truth [which he directed] here. That will go down as the most meaningful trip to Sundance. I remember the first screening of An Inconvenient Truth, they gave it a standing ovation. I was crying so much. It still makes me cry thinking of it.

It’ll be hard to measure up to that ever again.
SHUE: I know, it’ll never measure up to that, but it doesn’t have to. I love this movie, actually. It’s really funny. Unique and different. And I just think Steve is a brilliant comedian. I want to do another comedy — and with him. [She points to Coogan, who’s been sitting nearby, ostensibly minding his own business.] I want him to write me a movie where we can be lovers. [Laughs]

[To Coogan] Would you like to join our conversation?
SHUE: Don’t you think he’s hot?

He’s not bad.
STEVE COOGAN: I’m not too pale for a Brit.
SHUE: With his new haircut! He’s got really funny hair in the movie.
COOGAN: It’s kind of ’80s: long, wavy. I had this long, fair hair. It was dyed and bleached and straightened. And then it got so brittle I just had to get rid of it all.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: [To Shue] How did you like working with the great Steve Coogan?
ELISABETH SHUE: Ah…. It was really incredible. It’s so easy.
STEVE COOGAN: We had great chemistry.
SHUE: We did.
COOGAN: We still have great chemistry.
SHUE: I want him.
COOGAN: I want her.

Well, don’t let me stand in the way. [To Coogan] So, what about working with the wonderful Elisabeth Shue?
COOGAN: It was tremendous and stupendous and chemically…
SHUE: Destabilizing.
COOGAN: Destabilizing!
SHUE: He plays this has-been actor whose most important role was being in the background of a herpes commercial.
COOGAN: I was in the foreground of a herpes commercial! The herpes commercial was all about me. And I’ve had a cold sore in real life. Carry on.
SHUE: And then, I play myself, Elisabeth Shue. I’ve quit the business and I’ve gone to Tucson, Ariz., to become a nurse. He comes into the fertility clinic where I work and he’s so excited to see me, because he’s a great lover of film and he thinks I’m just so wonderful.
COOGAN: I’m obsessed with Elisabeth Shue. I metaphorically and literally kiss her ass. And I invite her to my school to give a talk. It’s very exciting. She says some very explicit things. I won’t tell you what they are. But they’re shocking for fans of Elisabeth Shue.

You play yourself — or a version of yourself?
SHUE: It was definitely a version of myself. The first day, I was really self-conscious and nervous because I didn’t know anybody. There were no rehearsals so I just showed up and started shooting. But Steve made me feel comfortable because he was so excited to see me in the scene that it just made me laugh every single time. [She laughs just talking about it] I felt like I understood the version I was supposed to play once he started to react to me.

[To Coogan] And your character — was he fun to play?
COOGAN: Yeah, it was a lot of fun. I play kind of a heroic fool whose heart’s in the right place, but he’s a bit of a jackass and he tries to save the drama department at his school by writing a sequel to Hamlet.
SHUE: It’s a musical!
COOGAN: It’s a happy version. He figures that the original HamletHamlet 1 — it’s a bit depressing when everyone dies at the end. So he wants he want to do a more uplifting, positive, Hollywood version.
SHUE: Jesus is in it. He comes in a time machine.
COOGAN: Jesus Christ. And Albert Einstein. He travels through time and meets a bunch of people.

Wow, so it’s like Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure?
COOGAN: It is like that, except that…it doesn’t star Keanu Reeves.

How does it feel to be at Sundance with a comedy?
COOGAN: Great. [At film festivals, there tends to be a lot of] interesting, quirky, odd, individualistic, kind of esoteric films that make you sad. Ours is a film that makes you laugh. It’s not a film that makes you think. But if you want to think, you can. It’s a kind of optional-thinking movie. You don’t have to think too much.
SHUE: Not at all.
COOGAN: Not at all, actually

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