Archive Page 2

23
Feb
08

Leonid Rozhetskins Trivia on IMdB.com

Date of Birth

4 August 1966, St. Petersburg, USSR

Birth Name

Leonid B. Rozhetskin

Trivia

In 2007, he co-founded a movie production company, L+E Productions, with Eric Eisner. Eisner is the son of Michael Eisner, the former Chief Executive Office of The Walt Disney Company. L+E Production’s mission is to finance and develop feature-length films.

He is also a board member and founding shareholder of City A.M., London’s first free daily business newspaper which covers news on the markets, global and local business as well as contemporary lifestyle features. City A.M. is read by over 100,000 professionals throughout London.

From October 2001 until January 2005, served as Executive Vice Chairman of Norilsk Nickel, Russia’s largest mining company and the world’s largest miner of nickel and palladium metals. He led the company’s efforts on transparency, corporate governance and external investment, including the acquisition of a controlling interest in Stillwater Mining Company, a U.S. miner of platinum and palladium metals. He also pioneered an investment of $1.2 billion to acquire a 20 percent interest in Gold Fields of South Africa. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of Norilsk Nickel.

In 1998, he left Renaissance Capital to co-found the independent venture capital firm, LV Finance. The advisory clients of LV Finance included international financier George Soros and founder of CNN Ted Turner. The company invested in a number of highly successful start-up ventures in the media and telecommunications industry, most notably, MegaFon, the third largest mobile phone operator in Russia. He sold his interest in LV Finance in 2003.

In 1995, his focus shifted from the law to financial ventures. He was part of a group that founded Renaissance Capital, Russia’s largest and most successful domestic investment bank. While with Renaissance Capital, he led the firm’s participation in listing the first Russian company on the New York Stock Exchange.

In 1992, Leonid Rozhetskin returned to Russia to open his own law firm, representing clients such as the International Finance Corporation (a division of the World Bank), Credit Suisse, Morgan Grenfell, and The Moscow Times.

From 1992 to 1994, Leonid Rozhetskin worked as an attorney at Sullivan & Cromwell and White & Case, both U.S. law firms.

From 1990 to 1991, Leonid Rozhetskin was a law clerk for Judge Stephen V. Wilson, a federal judge in Los Angeles, California.

In 1990, he graduated cum laude from Harvard Law School.

Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics from Columbia University with distinction in 1987.




																
22
Feb
08

Chek out Leonid Rozhetskins Cast Members on “Boogie Woogie” and get as excited as I am

“Boogie Woogie”, co-produced by Leonid Rozhetskin, is supposed to be relaesed this Year. Currently the movies status is in “post production” and there arent a lot of details yet. But just have a look at the casting and find all these famous names such as Christipher Lee or Heather Graham and I think you will waite as desperate as me for the final release.

Directed by

Duncan Ward  

Writing credits

(in alphabetical order)

Danny Moynihan novel
Danny Moynihan screenplay

Cast (in alphabetical order)

Heather Graham Beth Freemantle
Amanda Seyfried Paige Prideaux
Gillian Anderson Jean Maclestone
Christopher Lee Alfred Rhinegold
Stellan Skarsgård Bob Maccelstone
Alan Cumming Dewey
Charlotte Rampling Emille
Danny Huston Art Spindle
Jaime Winstone Elaine
Joanna Lumley Alfreda Rhinegold
Alfie Allen Photographer
Gemma Atkinson Charlotte Bailey
Simon McBurney Robert Freign
Jack Huston Joe
Meredith Ostrom Joany
Stephen Greif Bobs Lawyer
Rosie Fellner Rachel Leighton
Michael Culkin Beth’s Father
Jenny Runacre Mrs. Havermeyer
Sidney Cole Cabbie
Jan Uddin Art’s Partner
Gaetano Jouen Himself

Produced by

Katrine Boorman …. executive producer
Steve Daly …. associate producer
Matthew Hobbs …. executive producer
Danny Moynihan …. producer
Kami Naghdi …. producer
Leonid Rozhetskin …. executive producer
Christopher Simon …. producer
Julia Stannard …. co-producer
Valentine Stockdale …. executive producer
Cat Villiers …. producer

Cinematography by

John Mathieson  

Film Editing by

Kant Pan  

Casting by

Gary Davy  

Production Design by

Caroline Greville-Morris  

Art Direction by

Nick Dent  

Production Management

Emma Pike …. production manager
Alex Sutherland …. production supervisor

Second Unit Director or Assistant Director

Alexander Fielding …. floor assistant director
Caroline Hatchman …. floor assistant director
Mark Hopkins …. second assistant director
Alex Oakley …. first assistant director
Emily Perowne …. third assistant director

Art Department

Joe Borowski …. stand-by props

Sound Department

Ken Lee …. sound mixer

Camera and Electrical Department

Sam Garwood …. camera operator
Paul Hatchman …. key grip
Mark Tillie …. still photographer

Other crew

Lorraine Edwards …. production secretary
Daniel Fellows …. location manager
Lewis Partovi …. production coordinator
Alex Sutherland …. production supervisor
Brigitte Ward-Holmes …. assistant accountant

Related;

 

Leonid Rozhetskin Co-Founder of the L+E Productions Production Company
Leonid Rozhetskin | L+E Productions Film Production 
Category:Film producers – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
L+E Productions : Leonid Rozhetskin
Leonid RozhetskinWikipedia, the free encyclopedia
17
Feb
08

Leonid Rozhetskin is doing the “Electris Slide” via NY Times

Leonid Rozhetskin is doing the Electric Slide

and I am not talking about the dance, but the freshly announced Movie.
Check it out
Director: Tristan Patterson
Cast: Romain Duris
Rating: NR

Review Summary

Biopic on charmer, Eddie Dodson, who ran a Melrose art deco store owner as a cover for his exploits as a bankrobber. In 1984, Dodson robbed 64 banks in less than a year. Arrested, Dodson served a 12-year sentence and once released, went on to work as caretaker for Jack Nicholson’s Malibu home. Eventually, though, Dodson was again arrested in 1999 for bank robbery and died at the age of 54 due to a failed liver. ~ Baseline StudioSystems

Movie Details

Title: The Electric Slide
Status: Announced
Country: United States
Genre: Drama, Crime, Biopic

Acting Credits & Production Credits

 
DirectorTristan Patterson
Source MaterialTimothy Ford
ScreenplayTristan Patterson
Executive ProducerJohn Wells
Executive Producer – Timothy Ford
Production Executive – Christine Vachon
Producer – Eric D. Eisner
Producer – Leonid Rozhetskin

 

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13
Feb
08

Leonid Rozhetskin; Hamlet2 via Reuters

“Hamlet 2” sends up suburbia in rowdy fashion

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Hamlet 2

By Duane Byrge

PARK CITY, Utah (Hollywood Reporter) – If art-house theatres still do weekend midnight showings where everyone dresses up as characters from the film, “Hamlet 2” would be a fitting selection. An erratic, freewheeling satire of Middle American mores, it should thrive as a festival curio, appealing to anti-establishment sensibilities.

The film’s marketers will face a challenge inducing the word-snobs of the smart set to slum with slapstick entertainment. Still, there’s enough rowdy and off-the-wall humour in “Hamlet 2” to perform princely at the box-office, particularly in college-city venues.

A slam-bang patchwork of more inspired comedies, such as “Ace Ventura: Pet Detective” and “Borat,” “Hamlet 2” centres on Dana Marschz (Steve Coogan), who attempts to teach drama in a Tucson, Arizona, high school. With delusions that he is soaring to great heights like Icarus, this doofus presents high school plays based on his favourite movies, including “Dead Poets Society” and “Mr. Holland’s Opus,” which appeal to his inflated ego but leave his charges flat. His productions are major fiascos, rightfully skewered by a ninth-grade drama critic.

In one of the movie’s many funny lines, Marschz admits that his life is like a parody of tragedy: He’s infertile, his wife is having an affair with their roommate, he has father issues, and he’s a recovering alcoholic. Not to mention, he’s talent-less.

Dramatically, “Hamlet 2” is a twist on the formula of let’s-put-on-a-show, with the twist being that no one wants the show, least of all the administration, which has chopped the school’s art funds. Even arts-funding advocates would notice that Marschz’s grandiose piffles are a major waste. As such, the film unwittingly makes a case for slashing funds for the arts. Lo, and unfortunately we behold, Marschz does smite the school board Philistines (not exactly a difficult target) with a last-ditch rally and a from-the-rafters opus.

Unlike Ace Ventura, Inspector Clouseau or other lovable loonies, Marschz is merely a knucklehead errant. He’s a creep, but he’s nicely endeared to us by Coogan’s funny, fey performance. Among the players, Elisabeth Shue delivers a winning rendition of herself; her appearance as a Tucson nurse who has rejected her show business career is one of the film’s best absurdities. Similarly, Amy Poehler is hilarious as a WASP-y, anti-Semitic ACLU lawyer.

Screenwriters Andrew Fleming and Pam Brady have slapped together a string of gags in a hit-and-miss dither. Some of it is quite brainy. There’s an appealing anarchic tone and anti-authority bent as well. There also are zany surrealistic moments and a devilish eye for incongruity, especially a rousing rendition of Elton John’s “Someone Saved My Life Tonight” as belted out by the Tucson Gay Chorus for the boondocks high school audience.

Director Fleming blasts the production along with keen comic pacing, which performs double duty in masking some of the more dim-witted moments.

Technically, “Hamlet 2” is distinguished by production designer Tony Fanning’s sendup of Southwestern suburbia.

Cast:

Dana Marschz: Steve Coogan

Brie Marschz: Catherine Keener

Herself: Elisabeth Shue

Cricket Feldstein: Amy Poehler

Gary: David Arquette

Principal Rocker: Marshall Bell

Octavio: Joseph Julian Soria

Rand Posin: Skylar Astin

Director: Andrew Fleming; Screenwriters: Andrew Fleming, Pam Brady; Producers: Eric Eisner, Leonid Rozhetskin, Aaron Ryder; Executive producers: Albert Berger, Ron Yerxa, Michael Flynn; Director of photography: Alexander Gruszynski; Editor: Jeff Freeman; Production designer: Tony Fanning; Music: Ralph Sall.

Reuters/Hollywood Reporter

Leonid Rozhetskin External links

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13
Feb
08

Leonid Rozhetskins Hamlet 2 on Wikipedia

Everything needs a Wiki Entry, here goes Hamlet 2:

Hamlet 2

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hamlet 2
Produced by Eric Eisner
Leonid Rozhetskin
Aaron Ryder
Written by Andrew Fleming
Pam Brady
Starring Steve Coogan
Catherine Keener
Amy Poehler
David Arquette
Music by Ralph Sall
Cinematography Alexander Gruszynski
Editing by Jeff Freeman
Distributed by Focus Features
Release date(s) TBA
Country United States
Language English
Budget $9 million
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Hamlet 2 is an upcoming comedy film directed by Andrew Fleming and starring Steve Coogan, Catherine Keener, Amy Poehler, and David Arquette. It was filmed primarily at a high school in New Mexico from September 2007 to October 2007. The film premiered at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival and will be distributed by Focus Features. A release date has yet to be announced.

 

Contents

[hide]

//

[edit] Premise

A high school is removing its drama department, but a drama teacher (Coogan) writes a sequel to the Shakespeare play Hamlet to save the department.[1]

[edit] Production

Screenwriters Andrew Fleming and Pam Brady began writing the script in 2003, but they incorporated the Shakespeare play Hamlet into the premise later on. The play shown within the film was written on deadline for production.[2] The film was budgeted at a little over $9 million.[3] Production began in September 2007 in New Mexico.[4] Filming took place mainly at West Mesa High School in Albuquerque, where actual students were permitted to perform as extras in the film.[5] Filming concluded on Halloween, October 31, 2007.[6] The film was executive produced by Albert Berger and Ron Yerxa, who also produced Little Miss Sunshine.[3]

[edit] Cast

[edit] Release

A rough edit of Hamlet 2 was prepared for the 2008 Sundance Film Festival, where it was a late addition, three days before its scheduled screening.[3] The film premiered at the festival on January 21, 2008. After the screening, an all-night bidding war took place for rights to distribution, which Focus Features won for $10 million, acquiring worldwide rights to the film.[1] The purchase of Hamlet 2 nearly broke the Sundance Film Festival record set by Little Miss Sunshine, which sold for $10.5 million in 2006.[3]

[edit] Critical reaction

Duane Byrge of The Hollywood Reporter described Hamlet 2 as “a slam-bang patchwork of more inspired comedies, such as Ace Ventura: Pet Detective and Borat“. Byrge described the premise as “a twist on the formula of let’s-put-on-a-show, with the twist being that no one wants the show”. He thought that the screenwriters had put together “a string of gags in a hit-and-miss dither”.[8]

Edward Douglas of ComingSoon.net described Hamlet 2 as “outrageously funny but it does require a certain type of sense of humor and the ability to laugh at very odd behavior and situations”. Douglas thought that Coogan played his character over-the-top, but found that through the film, “you really start to love him”. He described the premise as “ludricous” but said, “Sometimes, you just have to turn off your brain and allow yourself to laugh.”[9]

The New York Times noted of the film, “It made sure to take shots at Christians, gays, Latinos, Jews, the American Civil Liberties Union and Elisabeth Shue, one of its lead actresses.”[2]

[edit] References

 

  1. ^ a b c d e f Anne Thompson. “Focus Features acquires ‘Hamlet 2’“, Variety, 200801-22. Retrieved on 200801-24.
  2. ^ a b David M. Halbfinger. “Done Deals Finally Start To Appear At Sundance”, The New York Times, 200801-23.
  3. ^ a b c d Lauren A.E. Schuker. “Comic ‘Hamlet 2’ Finally Gets Sales Going at Sundance”, Wall Street Journal, 200801-23.
  4. ^ Francesca Martin. “Great Danes go head to head”, The Guardian, 200709-12.
  5. ^ Megan Martin. “Students learn about making movies from an on-the-set perspective”, Albuquerque Journal, 200711-06.
  6. ^ Dan Mayfield. “N.M. movies make Sundance cut”, Albuquerque Journal, 200801-11.
  7. ^ a b Gregg Goldstein. “‘Hamlet 2’ to be among New Frontiers“, The Hollywood Reporter, 200712-20. Retrieved on 200801-24.
  8. ^ Duane Byrge. ““Hamlet 2” sends up suburbia in rowdy fashion“, The Hollywood Reporter, Reuters, 200801-23. Retrieved on 200801-24.
  9. ^ Edward Douglas. “Reviews: The Great Buck Howard & Hamlet 2“, ComingSoon.net, 200801-23. Retrieved on 200801-24.

[edit] External links

Retrieved from “http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamlet_2

 

07
Feb
08

Join Leonid Rozhetskin on Xing.com

Discover the Benefits of Xing.com and join Leonid Rozhetskins Network

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More Leonid Rozhetskin online on;

IMdB & Wikipedia

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07
Feb
08

Leonid Rozhetskin; Sundance: The Scoop on ”Hamlet 2”

 Via Entertaiment Weekly

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If you’re a fan of Steve Coogan, that King Leer of a motormouth British comedian who starred in 24 Hour Party People, came to Hollywood (remember his glorious performance as his own trumped-up self in Jim Jarmusch‘s Coffee and Cigarettes?), and saw his crossover American career do a nosedive before it had even gotten off the ground, then you won’t want to miss Hamlet 2, in which he’s like the son of Peter Sellers crossed with a more handsome version of Tiny Tim. This is the movie that Coogan cultists have been waiting for — the one that finally lets him cut his inner wildman loose, only within a structure that lends method to his madness.

He plays a godawful failed actor, despised by his wife (a scalding Catherine Keener), who has become a self-loathing high-school drama teacher, and Coogan turns this pathetic yet insistently egomaniacal creature into a loser-nerd of genius. He mugs, he glowers, he hams up his telling of jokes too corny-horrible to print, and — most mesmerizingly — he comes on like a sarcastic geek acting like a swishy queen trying to pass himself off as a ”normal” heterosexual Middle American.

Make no mistake: The gay/not gay camp-theatrical weirdness is built right into Hamlet 2, which Andrew Fleming has directed and cowritten like a broader, more looney-tunes version of Waiting for Guffman. To save his job, Coogan’s lowly drama instructor writes and stages a musical sequel to Hamlet 2, in which a time machine returns the great Dane to life, so that he can save himself and everyone else in the play. As opening night approaches, the show becomes hugely controversial, because it is blasphemous (and demented) in almost every way. Yet really, it’s a high school musical that would make John Waters proud. You may wonder what could possibly be funny about a song called ”Raped in the Face,” but when you see this and other numbers, such as ”Rock Me Sexy Jesus,” they give off such a happy blast of cluelessness that the show seems to be rediscovering — through its very offensiveness — the unhinged glory of showbiz.

Hamlet 2 doesn’t have the exquisiteness of Guffman; with Coogan as its maestro/vamp in chief, it’s more like a one-man demolition derby of bad taste. But you will laugh, and, with any luck, you will become a believer in Steve Coogan, who in this film proves as uproarious an anarchist as Sascha Baron Cohen. At Sundance 2008, that’s what independence looked like.

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